How to close your blog gracefully.

I wrote this a while ago but it went live at a very busy time so only now am I really getting around to promoting and sharing it. I am very privileged to have featured as a guest blogger on the Thesis Whisperer blog: it’s a blog that I often like to read! Anyway, read on for my collated experience and observations about closing blogs…

The Thesis Whisperer

This post is by Jenny Delasalle, a blogger and freelance blog manager for the Piirus blog, amongst many roles, past and present. Piirus is an online, research collaboration matching service that is provided to the international research community by the University of Warwick, UK, and it aims to support researchers through its blog as well as introducing you to each other. Here, Jenny looks into a theme which she confesses she’s got wrong herself sometimes: some ways to quit blogging!

Screen Shot 2016-02-21 at 11.18.29 amThere are lots of great reasons to blog, but are also sometimes reasons to stop. You might not be getting benefits from your blog any more, or your interests might change. Maybe you’ve ‘inherited’ a blog along with a new job, but blogging isn’t your style. Blogging is potentially an endless commitment, so choosing how and when to stop is difficult and there’s not much advice out…

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A useful tool for librarians: metrics knowledge in bite-sized pieces By Jenny Delasalle

Here is a guest blogpost that I wrote for the new, very interesting Bibliomagician blog.

the Bibliomagician

Metrics_poster_verticalHaving worked in UK academic libraries for 15 years before becoming freelance, I saw the rise and rise of citation counting (although as Geoffrey Bilder points out, it should rightly be called reference counting). Such counting, I learnt, was called “bibliometrics”. The very name sounds like something that librarians should be interested in if not expert at, and so I delved into what they were and how they might help me and also the users of academic libraries. It began with the need to select which journals to subscribe to, and it became a filter for readers to select which papers to read. Somewhere along the road, it became a measurement of individual researchers, and a component of university rankings: such metrics were gaining attention.

Then along came altmetrics, offering tantalising glimpses of something more than the numbers: real stories of impact that could be found through online tracking. Context…

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Event reporting: An Open Science meet-up in Berlin

Last week I went along to an Open Science meet-up here in Berlin. It was hosted at the Centre for Entrepreneurship at the Technische Universitaet and the theme of the evening was

Academic Papers: collaboration, writing & discovery

There were presentations from two interesting, freshly developed collaboration tools for researchers:
  1. Paperhive –  About having conversations about a paper, such that if you don’t understand something you can ask a question and someone else will answer it.  It doesn’t create copies of papers but allows you to search for them and when you view the paper through their interface, you see the comments. Collaborative reading!
  2. Authorea –  Tool for co-authoring a paper, which apparently works with LATEX and Google docs and other formats besides. “puts emphasis on collaboration and structured, visual editing.” Collaborative writing!
Discussion at the meeting was interesting: it was led by Alex from Paperhive, who evoked the “spirit of open science”, i.e. collaboration and sharing. And we all did share: if you’re interested in such themes then take a look at Twitter conversations with the #openscience hashtag, as of course some folks tweeted at the event!
I chatted to fellow freelancers and to researchers including Franzi, who is involved in a citizen science project at Berlin’s Natural History Museum, and also Sebastian who works for an open access publisher – of great sounding digital books – Language Science Press.
I was left reflecting on how data sharing can be achieved, as opening access to papers is one thing, but opening your data and your whole science is another… being open at the beginning about methodologies can help people to join disparate studies together and share the same methodology to make the results of their research more powerful. But as ever, being open is just the start of the process because you also have to make yourself heard! What channels are there for doing this? And of course, we all of researchers who won’t release data because they want to get another 5 papers out of it themselves. Yet who can blame them in the publish or perish climate? What we measure and incentivise researchers for can have damaging effects, not least the salami slicing of research that would be far more meaningfully written up in a single paper, instead of across 6! How can we make open data itself the output? Well, such themes are big and not for me to worry about, thank goodness. Last week was also the LIBER conference in Helsinki and there the library mangers and repository and publishing folks were very busy discussing data related themes. Once again, Twitter gives a flavour of the kind of things discussed there.